2014 Food & Wine: China

I think that China is probably one of Matt’s top kiosks during the Food & Wine Festival, thanks to his love of Chinese food in general. I may have lost count of the number of Mongolian Beef Buns we’ve had over the past few years. ๐Ÿ™‚

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This year introduces Roasted Beijing Duck to the menu, which is served in a Steamed Bun with Hoisin Sauce. It’s also the second most expensive dish being served at the kiosks, being beat out by Canada’s “Le Cellier” Wild Mushroom Beef Filet Mignon, which rings in at $7.25. I also don’t recall seeing duck on any of the past F&W menus before, so we were definitely excited for this dish.

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The steamed bun is the same as is used for the Mongolian Beef, so it a light, airy, chewy bun. Nestled inside are thick shreds of rich, tender ducked topped with sweet, salty Hoisin. Some of the pieces of duck had some sweet, crispy caramelization from cooking. There was also thinly sliced red onion and what might be shaved green onion – I don’t think I got a bite of the latter, as this dish was more for Matt. ๐Ÿ™‚ It easily made 0urย  must-eat list, and we’ll be back for it again before the Festival ends.

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Here are pictures of the other menu items being served, along with links to the original reviews. The Mongolian Beef is also a must-have for us, and we’ll definitely be ordering it again!

2013-food-wine-china-mongolian-beef-in-a-steamed-bunMongolian Beef

The Black Pepper Shrimp underwhelmed last year, though the portion was large. The shrimp were overdone and didn’t have much, if any, black pepper kick. While I wasn’t a fan of the noodles, however, Matt liked them, but both of us were hoping for at least some mild Sichuan kick.

2013-food-wine-china-black-pepper-shrimpBlack Pepper Shrimp

2013-food-wine-china-chicken-potstickersChicken Potstickers

We first had the Kung Fu Punch during the 2013 Flower & Garden Festival, and it was definitely a strong yet well mixed drink.

2013-flower-garden-lotus-house-kung-fu-punchKung Fu Punch

The Happy Lychee is on the sweet side, so the lime came in handy. It also was a relatively strong drink.

2012-fw-china-happy-lycheeHappy Lychee

UPDATE!

Matt couldn’t resist stopping back at China! He once again enjoyed the Mongolian Beef, which he hasn’t had since last Festival. It’s served in a Steamed Bun with Chili Mayo, but Sriracha is provided should you want a bit more heat. We think this one has a good flavor on it’s own, but don’t mind livening it up a bit more since we like heat.

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We also revisited the Roasted Beijing Duck, and it remains delicious with hearty pieces of tender duck. There were fewer green onions this time around, and Matt also added Sriracha for an extra kick.

2014-food-wine-china-roasted-beijing-duck

Weโ€™ll keep you posted on updated reviews from China as the 2014 Epcot International Food & Wine Festival continues. What have you tried from the kiosk, and what did you think? What are you looking forward to trying?

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9 responses to “2014 Food & Wine: China

  1. I’ve been dying to try the roasted duck from the second I saw it on the menu. I was a bit crestfallen, however, to see the raw onion on it as that is something I seriously detest- everything else about the dish looks amazing. Is the onion fairly easy to pick off (looks like it might be), or do you think it would be easy to just order it sans onion?

  2. It’s possible you could order it sans onion and they might be able to assemble a bun sans onion for you. If not, it’s definitely easy to pick off! ๐Ÿ™‚

  3. I so wanted to try the roast duck when they announced it this year. I really hope they’ll have it next year (and I’ll be allowed to go!). The Peking duck wraps that I love are similar and I have enjoyed their Mongolian beef dish in the past. I don’t eat the potstickers mostly because I make those at home and I prefer the handmade dough my grandma taught me. ๐Ÿ™‚

  4. I really hope the duck proves a hit as well! I’d love to see it again next year! I typically skip potstickers because I find them too oily most of the time, especially in situations like F&W. I’ve made them at home before, and they can be labor intensive (like homemade pierogies!), but they are completely worth it! ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. The China booth was a bit disappointing to me ๐Ÿ˜ฆ
    I had the duck bun and while it had some good flavor, I received it almost cold. Along with it, I had the Happy Lychee. I usually love lychee drinks but this one I couldn’t finish. It just tasted weird. Also, it was late and it had rained a lot, which explained why the CM at the booth didn’t look very happy… Thumbs down, unfortunately… ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

  6. Sorry to hear that! Our duck was served warm, and I know how receiving a cold item that should be warm or hot can really take its toll. I’ve been skipping alcohol for the most part from kiosks, opting instead for “old favorites” from the regular beverage stands for a full size beer or just plain old water, because it has been hot and humid!

  7. I definitely understand what you mean by labor intensive. ๐Ÿ™‚ For me the difficult part is the filling and getting that taste/texture right. I hate it when people shortcut the dough with pre made though. It just doesn’t taste the same and it really is easy to do (although my grandma had been teaching me ever since I was little on the skins so that’s probably why I find it very easy, 20+ years of practice will do that lol). I’m thinking of experimenting with 00 flour for the dough. She always complained that the ap flour here was very rough compared to the stuff in Hong Kong (that was sold in the old fashioned cloth flour bags).

    I do wish they’d make some desserts. Even something non-threatening like the dan tat (an egg tart similar to the Portuguese egg tart). But I guess since desserts aren’t a big thing in China they are following the culture.

  8. An Egg Tart would be a great idea! They sell them at Hong Kong Disneyland. I can’t imagine they’d be much more difficult to create than the little Florida Kumquat Pies served during Flower & Garden. ๐Ÿ™‚

  9. Hmmm, I agree, if they are already doing the kumquat pies, the egg tart isn’t too far from that mark. It is slightly labor intensive but i’m sure they could find good shortcuts to do it and just store it in a hot box.