2015 Epcot International Flower & Garden Festival: Primavera Kitchen

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If you’ve been reading the blog for a while, you probably know I tend to skip the offerings at the kiosks outside of Italy during Flower & Garden and Food & Wine. Sure, I’ve reviewed a handful of items over the years from these kiosks, but haven’t been blown away by anything that would make me return.

2015 Epcot International Flower & Garden Festival Menu Prices Primavera Kitchen

This year, however, I just decided to go for it at order one of each food item from Primavera Kitchen. I started with the Fior di Latte, Prosciutto e Pane di Casa ($5.75). This dish is a Pinwheel of Mozzarella and Proscuitto served with Olio Toscano and Ciabatta Bread.

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As someone who enjoys cheese, I liked the amount that was being served. The Prosciutto added some needed salt to it as well. When I later showed the picture to Matt, who had some interest in trying the dish, he noted that it looked like way to much cheese, and that he was hoping for more prosciutto.

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The Cast Member also poured quite a bit of oil on my plate, but the dry bread definitely needed it. I wouldn’t consider this a must-order, but if Matt still wants to try it, I’d help with the cheese.

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Usually, the pasta dishes served leave a lot to be desired in terms of flavor. The Cheese Manicotti ($5.75) fared better than I anticipated. This Egg Pasta is stuffed with Mozzarella, Ricotta, Parmesan, Tomato Sauce, and Bechamel.

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The mozzarella for this dish was on top of the pasta, with the ricotta and Parmesan tucked inside. Some 0f the edges of the pasta not protected by cheese were a bit dry.

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There was a lot of cheese filling in the Manicotti, which was nice. The sauce was still on the bland side, but overall, I thought it was one of the better filled-pasta dishes I’ve ordered from a kiosk. It would be a hearty Festival choice, especially for a vegetarian, but once was enough for me.

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The Limoncello Panna Cotta ($5.00, gluten-free) is Lemon Custard with Limoncello Liqueer, and Raspberries. When it comes to desserts, I tend to lean toward fruit flavors. I love raspberries, so I was looking forward to trying this one.

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Raspberries were not only on top of the dish, but there were also some tucked inside, breaking up the lemony and not overly sweet flavor of the panna cotta.

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There was a hint of the Limoncello, but it wasn’t overpowering. This was rich but not heavy, and the lighter flavors and cold temperature were perfect for the heat.

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Overall, Primavera Kitchen did some things nicely, while their were some things that could be improved upon. The Fior di Latte isn’t out of play since Matt still has some interest, but the Cheese Manicotti, while one of the better dishes I’ve had from a kiosk outside of Italy in a while, still could use some more flavor. If I’m looking for something sweet, the Limoncello Panna Cotta could see a return, especially if I’m looking for a cool, light treat (though it is pricey for the little cup).

Have you stopped by Primavera Kitchen? What is your favorite item?

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3 responses to “2015 Epcot International Flower & Garden Festival: Primavera Kitchen

  1. As a lover of mozzarella, I think that wheel looks AMAZING. Suspicious of that added oil, but I betcha it’s something you could replicate at home without it!

  2. The outrageous cost and mediocre food has kept me away since my first experience with Italy booths. I would love to try the panna cotta but can’t justify the price and $5.75 for one manicotti which is easily made at home for a fraction of the cost isn’t worth a try. Good to know it tastes a bit better this year.

  3. Jenn – It could definitely be recreated at home easy. Some whole milk mozz, some prosciutto, homemade ciabatta… A touch of oil (for the bread – the mozz and prosciutto have plenty of fat and flavor!), and perhaps a chiffonade of basil. Yum!

    Tracy – I do agree – the Italy kiosks are pricey in comparison to the items at many of the other booths. Some of the prices they put on dishes makes me think they picked a number out of a hat! And yes, the manicotti is less expensive to make at home, but unless I want to use up valuable freezer space, I can’t justify making a full pan of it for just the two of us. 😉